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Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro User Manual

Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro User Manual PDF Download

Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro User Manual – Lenovo’s third-generation yoga laptop is as versatile as ever, except it’s noticeably thinner and lighter, so much so that it’s now one of the thinnest Ultrabooks on the market. Battery life has also improved, but it’s still lagging behind the competition, no doubt because that slim design leaves no room for a larger cell.

If you ask me, Intel’s Core M platform was one of the most exciting things announced this year. Why? Because they make machines like this possible, a 13-inch convertible laptop that measures only half an inch thick and weighs 2.62 pounds. That’s significantly lighter than the MacBook Air, which weighs 2.96 pounds and measures 0.68 inches at its thickest point, and that’s without the extra weight of a touchscreen. Of course, I should point out that, in fact, we’ve seen some other superlight systems, and even before Core M arrived on the scene. Sony’s discontinued VAIO Pro 13, for example, came at 2.34 pounds, while the Acer Aspire S7 is 0.5 inches thick, the same as the new Yoga. (The S7 is a little heavier, at 2.87 pounds). Still, these machines were normal laptops; they rarely had the kind of versatile design that makes Yoga and another 2 in 1 so special. The fact that Lenovo can equip yoga with a 360-degree hinge and still make that skinny one, well, an impressive feat.

Speaking of this type, in addition to using a new Core M chip, Lenovo redesigned the Yoga hinge to now be approximately 2mm thinner than in the previous generation. What we have here is a new hinge “Clock Band”, to use the Lenovo term, consisting of six different strength points, each of which looks, you guessed, a link on a wristwatch. The new design adds a bit of shine, of course, but it’s also supposedly stronger: the laptop weight is now distributed over six discrete hinge points, rather than just two. In addition, the new design allows you to place the laptop on a table with the keyboard and screen facing up. In any case, the hinge still feels sturdy; you can fold the screen back into tablet mode, “Store” or “Support” in a smooth and controlled motion. I also like how the rounded, textured hinge makes it much easier to grip with one hand. However, I would like to notice that the Palm Rest of Yoga has a little strength, which means that I often heard a slight creak when I held the machine in my hands and folded the screen back. A little disconcerting, no one likes to hear a noise like that, but I’m also sure it had nothing to do with the hinge mechanism that connects the screen to the rest of the system.

As a result of the new hinge design, there is no space on the back edge for vents, or ports, for that matter. In fact, there’s a small fan in the back, but the air comes out of a small slit, so thin it could be easily lost if I didn’t know what I was looking for. As for the ports, they are all on the left and right sides, with micro-HDMI output, an SD reader and a USB 3.0 jack on the left. Also on that side is the AC port, which doubles as a USB 2.0 connection, a nice touch, as it means you can use the same AC adapter for your laptop and any other devices you may have. Meanwhile, on the right, you’ll find the power key, volume control, headphone jack, auto-turn button, and a second USB 3.0 port, new to this year’s model. The power button in particular is now further back than it used to be, so users don’t press it by accident (for registration, this was never a problem for me).

Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro User Manual – Apart from that, the drastically thinner design and more eye-catching hinge, the Yoga 3 Pro follows the same design concept as the two Yoga laptops that came before. That is, the keyboard is automatically disabled when you bend the screen more than 190 degrees. This also means that the keys are still exposed on the back when you are holding the device in tablet mode, but that’s a disadvantage of having such a thin machine: Lenovo’s self-flattened keyboard, which you used in your ThinkPad Yoga Ultrabook, requires a much thicker hinge and chassis. Unfortunately, the home button built into the bezel doesn’t always respond, a problem our Laptop Mag friends also experienced. Fortunately, at least one Lenovo representative told us that a software solution will arrive before the end of December.

One thing that hasn’t changed is the screen: even though Yoga got smaller, Lenovo kept the same 13.3-inch, 3,200 x 1,800 IPS panel. The viewing angles are good, whether you’re looking out from the outside or sinking the screen much further forward, as you would in a small seat. To that end, Lenovo also covered the screen with a low-gloss finish that ensures that light reflections rarely get in the way. Finally, a 72 percent color gamut allows for some bold colors, but not too saturated. Annoyingly, certain aspects of the Windows operating system and certain websites still look small with that high screen resolution, but you can hardly blame Lenovo for that; It is also a problem on other super high resolution Windows laptops.

On the front of the audio, Lenovo moved to a different speaker brand (JBL), as well as MaxxAudio’s new equalizer software to keep everything well tuned. Unfortunately, I didn’t appreciate the sound as much as I thought in this review. On the one hand, the location of the speakers at the bottom of the machine compensates for what would otherwise be a healthy volume. Also, like most other laptops I’ve tried, the sound is tiny and distant, and is obvious in almost every musical genre, from jazz to classical music, hip-hop. The only time the sound really seemed balanced was when I listened to music with synthetic elements, tracks like M.I.A.’s “Paper Planes” and The Swiss’s “Bubble Bath”.

Given that the Core M is a lower-powered chip largely designed to improve battery life, it’s no wonder that performance is affected compared to the fourth-generation Intel Core processors you’ll find in most other Ultra book. However, the truth is that this is only confirmed in the reference tests. Yes, there’s a bit of immersion there, especially in the graphics tests, but in everyday use, the Yoga 3 Pro felt as agile as I’d like it to be a $1,300 laptop. Bootup takes only nine seconds, which is almost as fast as what you’ll get in a notebook of this class. The Samsung-made SSD achieved maximum read speeds of 554 MB/s and maximum writes of 261 MB/s, demonstrating a solid-state drive that is not PCIe-based. And while previous Yoga laptops have received complaints about their WiFi performance, the new 802.11ac radio here maintained a constant and fast connection. In all, too, the machine remained fresh, an obvious benefit of using a lower power CPU.

Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro User Manual – On paper, the battery life of the Yoga 3 Pro seems to be a step below its predecessor, mainly because now the battery is smaller: 54Wh vs. 54Wh. 44.8. In fact, however, the runtime is a noticeable improvement in the last generation. In total, the Yoga 3 Pro was maintained for seven hours and 36 minutes of continuous video playback; that’s about an hour longer than the Yoga 2 Pro lasted. Of course, it pales in comparison to the MacBook Air, which managed almost 13 hours the last time we evaluated it, but still, it’s on par with other super-thin laptops, such as the Acer Aspire S7-392. After a certain point, I guess you either need to make room for a larger battery, or settle for a slightly shorter run time. That’s reasonable compensation, but I wouldn’t want the battery life to be much shorter either.

One thing that hasn’t changed is the screen: even though Yoga got smaller, Lenovo kept the same 13.3-inch, 3,200 x 1,800 IPS panel. The viewing angles are good, whether you’re looking out from the outside or sinking the screen much further forward, as you would in a small seat. To that end, Lenovo also covered the screen with a low-gloss finish that ensures that light reflections rarely get in the way. Finally, a 72 percent color gamut allows for some bold colors, but not too saturated. Annoyingly, certain aspects of the Windows operating system and certain websites still look small with that high screen resolution, but you can hardly blame Lenovo for that; It is also a problem on other super high resolution Windows laptops.

On the front of the audio, Lenovo moved to a different speaker brand (JBL), as well as MaxxAudio’s new equalizer software to keep everything well tuned. Unfortunately, I didn’t appreciate the sound as much as I thought in this review. On the one hand, the location of the speakers at the bottom of the machine compensates for what would otherwise be a healthy volume. Also, like most other laptops I’ve tried, the sound is tiny and distant, and is obvious in almost every musical genre, from jazz to classical music, hip-hop. The only time the sound really seemed balanced was when I listened to music with synthetic elements, tracks like M.I.A.’s “Paper Planes” and The Swiss’s “Bubble Bath”.

Given that the Core M is a lower-powered chip largely designed to improve battery life, it’s no wonder that performance is affected compared to the fourth-generation Intel Core processors you’ll find in most other Ultra book. However, the truth is that this is only confirmed in the reference tests. Yes, there’s a bit of immersion there, especially in the graphics tests, but in everyday use, the Yoga 3 Pro felt as agile as I’d like it to be a $1,300 laptop. Bootup takes only nine seconds, which is almost as fast as what you’ll get in a notebook of this class. The Samsung-made SSD achieved maximum read speeds of 554 MB/s and maximum writes of 261 MB/s, demonstrating a solid-state drive that is not PCIe-based. And while previous Yoga laptops have received complaints about their WiFi performance, the new 802.11ac radio here maintained a constant and fast connection. In all, too, the machine remained fresh, an obvious benefit of using a lower power CPU.

On paper, the battery life of the Yoga 3 Pro seems to be a step below its predecessor, mainly because now the battery is smaller: 54Wh vs. 54Wh. 44.8. In fact, however, the runtime is a noticeable improvement in the last generation. In total, the Yoga 3 Pro was maintained for seven hours and 36 minutes of continuous video playback; that’s about an hour longer than the Yoga 2 Pro lasted. Of course, it pales in comparison to the MacBook Air, which managed almost 13 hours the last time we evaluated it, but still, it’s on par with other super-thin laptops, such as the Acer Aspire S7-392. After a certain point, I guess you either need to make room for a larger battery, or settle for a slightly shorter run time. That’s reasonable compensation, but I wouldn’t want the battery life to be much shorter either.

Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro User Manual

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